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Say What You Mean, Especially If You Want to Retain Donors, CSL Plasma

I donate plasma at CSL Plasma here in Springfield, Ohio. Normally, I think they’re an awesome company, and I’m proud to be a donor. However, this post is about something that happend on Monday, September 21, 2015. I don’t generally like throwing companies under the bus when I’m over-all pleased with them, but…This deserves a post.

Myself and my fiancee, Megan, went in to donate today. When donating plasma, you’re not only helping others, but you do receive some financial compensation, which is a nice bonus. Also, you’re allowed to donate twice a week…Unlike blood donation, where you can only do it once every 8 weeks. Every 16 if you donate a double unit of red cells.

As those who know us know, Megan wennt to the local emergency room Thursday. She wasn’t feeling well, and due to her insurance, the ER was a better option than an urgent care. She was treated and released, with no complications found other than low potassium. As ER’s and any other doctor’s offices do, they did blood tests. When we went to donate, the floor staff spotted a bruise that was too small for Megan, or any of our sighted family members to see. Because of this, they sent her to see a nurse. In this case, the nurse was Maggie. I only mention the nurse’s name because she’s a source of trouble later in the story, and, as I learned, a prior source of trouble for Megan.

Maggie deferred her, stating she needed to get a note from the hospital that she’d had blood work done. I understand this, as there are concerns about needle drug use, which neither of us are fans of. I have had no personal experience with this nurse, so have no personal bias against her. Apparently, this same nurse had deferred Megan years ago because she was seeking treatment from a mental health professional, which CSL was aware of. Megan had donated plasma several times after making CSL aware of her involvement with mental health counselors, but for whatever reason, Maggie decided she needed deferment based on her mental health, and wanted a note stating she’s mentally stable enough to donate. So, I’m beginning to think Maggie has something against Megan personally, or those who aren’t as perfect as her.

So, we went to the hospital, and got a note, signed by the on-duty nurse, that Megan had indeed had blood work done. We returned to the Springfield location of CSL with said note, and Megan went in. Unfortunately, she again dealt with Maggie. I say “unfortunately” because Maggie can’t recall what she said before, or just likes to screw around with the donors. Upon arriving, Megan presented the note, which is what Nurse Maggie requested. At this point, Maggie informed her CSL would need her discharge papers.

Here’s where I take issue with things, and why I’m writing this post and putting Maggie and CSL, whom I’m otherwise pleased with, on blast. First, if you want discharge papers, and not just a note saying blood work was done, say so. It’s not that hard…Is it?

Next, as Megan’s diagnosis, though technnically referred to as chest pain, had nothing to do with heart trouble or anything else in the high-risk categories, her medical records and discharge papers are none of CSL Plasma’s business.

We’ve left a voice mail with the manager of the plasma center, and await her response. I’ve advised Megan to return with the notice, and the discharge papers…To request a nurse other than Maggie, and to explain what was requested. IF they require the discharge papers, then I expect the manager to allow Megan to explain things, and to continue to allow her to donate as she’s not in one of the high-risk categories according to the doctor, the physician’s assistant, nurse, and all others who worked with her.

When I first donated a couple weeks ago, I was told plasma donation gets a bad rap. Well, if you have nurses like Maggie, making it difficult for willing and able donors to donate, you’re going to continue to have a bad wrap. Personally, I like donating. yes, the compensation is great…But, I do it because I love the fact I can donate more frequently than I can with straight blood, and the plasma has uses for people in multiple ways. It’s a good feeling to know I’m helping out. But, if you push out someone I care about just because one of your nurses can’t communicate properly, you’ll lose her, me, and anyone else I can convince not to donate to your company.

Updates will be coming soon as to what happens with this issue. Watch this post.

One thought on “Say What You Mean, Especially If You Want to Retain Donors, CSL Plasma

  1. some people just make us jump through hoops it’s not even funny. I make sure I’m particular about anything I ever disclose when I have appointments if somebody asks for a note to say that there was blood taken earlier on then that should be all that’s asked for. nothing g ore nothing less. if a note isn’t necessary then we have a right to say so without getting orked up and what if megan had a mental health issue what if she didn’t it’s not for somebody to use that as a reason to hold a grudge against somebody that’s if it is to say that this nurse held a grudge I know I’m probably clutching at straws here but in my opinion people should be much more clearer about what it is they want without preamble and sorry if I sounded as if I was dragging megan into any questioning but I suppose in a way I’ve got a point and whether somebody has mental health issues or whatever issues they have is the business of that person alone and if it’s disclosed to a hospital or any agency it’s meant to be strictly confidential and not to be used to somebody’s advantage. end of story.

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